Children and Young Adults

Every family living with childhood cancer is thrown into upheaval. The good news, however, is that most childhood patients can expect to have full and productive lives. Many childhood cancer survivors return to school, attend college, enter the workforce, marry and become parents. Nevertheless, being vigilant about follow-up care, being aware of long-term and late effects of treatment, helping your child return to school and even dealing with your emotions are all things you'll need to manage — and these pages will help guide you. 

LLS is committed to helping children not only survive their cancer but thrive in their lives after treatment. We encourage you to learn more about The LLS Children’s Initiative, our multi-year effort to bring better treatments and care to children with blood cancer. .

In this section:

Childhood Blood Cancer

Because of new and better therapies, blood cancer survival rates for children have improved significantly during the last several decades. In addition, doctors, nurses and researchers continue to search for the causes of childhood leukemia, lymphoma and MDS to develop even better treatments and tailor therapies to decrease toxic side effects. Social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists and other health professionals...

Young Adults

Missed Digital CancerCon 2020? The conference has been archived and fully accessible by attendees and new registrants. Digital CancerCon 2020 will remain open until August 2nd. Click Here   As a young adult with cancer, you will likely face challenges specific to your age group (ages 18-39). We are here to help. ...

Long-Term And Late Effects Of Treatment For Childhood Cancer Surv...

Treatment for childhood blood cancer may consist of chemotherapy and other drug therapies and may also include radiation therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. There are risks for long-term and late effects common to all of these treatments, and these may include problems with learning, fatigue, bone or joint pain and an increased risk for developing a secondary cancer.  Some long-term and late effe...

image of child patient and doctor

Follow-Up Care For Childhood Cancer Survivors

Childhood cancer survivors have special long-term healthcare needs. You may want to consider a survivorship program for your child that focuses on life after cancer. Coordination between your child's cancer specialists and pediatrician is essential to provide the best care. Survivors don't necessarily need a cancer specialist for routine checkups and screening, but they do need to see doctors who understand thei...

Childhood Blood Cancer Facts and Statistics

Childhood Blood Cancers From 2012 to 2016, the most recent 5 years for which data are available, leukemia and lymphoma accounted for 38.7 percent of all cancer types in children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years. The most common types of cancer in children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years are leukemia (24.7 percent), cancers of the brain and other nervous tissue (17.2 perc...

Childhood and Young Adult Resources

On this Page: Resources for Children, Young Adults and Parents Resources for Healthcare Professionals
  Resources for Children, Young Adults and Parents One-on-One Support Information Specialists are social workers, nurses and health educators with expertise in blood cancers who  provide personalized support to patients, caregivers and families. Registered Dietitians&...